The Art of Interrogation

How do you get your villain to confess? How do you know if a witness is telling the truth? Paul Bishop, who is a nationally recognized behaviorist interrogation expert and veteran LAPD detective, conducted this session at the Writers’ Police Academy. (He’s also a writer. Check out his books.) Paul Bishop’s … Continue reading

Back from the Dead

Writing a story where a character overdoses on drugs? I am, so while I was at the Writers’ Police Academy I attend a session that dealt with that subject. Eric Paulowski was the instructor and, of course, the topic was the opioid addiction that’s been in the news this year. … Continue reading

The Wonderful World of Crime Evidence

We’ve heard that what you see on CSI isn’t reality, that one can’t get fingerprint matches or facial recognition as quickly as shown, but the truth is, science and computers are bringing us closer and closer to what is shown. Just a week or so ago the news reported how … Continue reading

Cowboy Hero Syndrome

Back in the 1940s and 50s the Lone Ranger, Roy Rogers, Gene Autry and others were the cowboy heroes. If a good guy was about to be hanged, the Lone Ranger would ride in and shoot the rope and the good guy was saved. Or Roy Rogers would shoot the … Continue reading

Writers’ Police Academy Overview

Michigan author, Elizabeth (Betty) Meyette, and I decided to travel and room together at this year’s Writers’ Police Academy. We took the 10:15 a.m. Lake Express Ferry from Muskegon to Milwaukee and arrived at the Hyatt Regency in Green Bay, Wisconsin around 2:30 p.m. (CDT). Our room wasn’t ready, but … Continue reading

Heading for WPA

  Tomorrow I leave for Green Bay, Wisconsin to attend this year’s Writers’ Police Academy. This is my third WPA, but my first in Wisconsin. (It used to be held in North Carolina.)  writerspoliceacademy My experiences in the past have been fantastic, and, looking at this year’s schedule, I’m sure I’ll … Continue reading

Each Story is Different

Today, please welcome Diane Burton as she relates how she came up with the idea for her most recent release, NUMBERS NEVER LIE, and why it took so long from idea to finished product. Thanks, Maris, for inviting me to your blog today. Ever since we met, twenty-some years ago, I’ve … Continue reading

And I Thought It Would Be Easy

I thought converting the PDF file I had that Hale Books Ldt used to print the hardcover version of A KILLER PAST would be easy. Simply convert the PDF document to a Word document, go through it and change the English use of single quotes for dialogue to our American … Continue reading

A Little Bit of This . . .

A little bit of this, a little bit of that. I have been working on so many things lately, my mind is a jumble. Last Friday I thought I had my previously published romance, LYON’S PRIDE, ready to upload to Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing. Actually I did upload the file, … Continue reading

Breaking the Rules

Last week I finished reading Lisa Gardner’s novel, Catch Me, and it started me thinking about some of the critique sessions I’ve sat in and blogs I’ve written that cover topics like point-of-view and how to format a manuscript. Why? Because in that book, Lisa uses both first person and … Continue reading

Getting My Rights Back

I finished writing and editing what I often call my “Old Lady” book in 2011. A KILLER PAST is the story of Mary Harrington, a 74-year- old widow who for 44 years has been living a quiet life in a small Michigan town. It’s only when two gang members try … Continue reading

Can you get published without spending a lot of money?

I recently received an email asking how a woman who had just finished writing a book could get it published without spending a lot of money. To answer a questions like this, I need more information. (1) Is this a novel, memoir, or non-fiction book? (2) Has she made sure … Continue reading

Do Something Different

I recently took a break from writing (and thinking about writing) to allow my other muse to play. For three days, from 9:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., I participated in a watercolor painting workshop. Now, I majored in art and taught art, but that was eons ago and I’ve never … Continue reading

Planning for a Book Talk

I have a friend whose first novel was recently published. Now she’s been asked to give talks to several different organizations: an historical group, a library, and a book store. Her questions are: What does she need to do prior to the talk and during the talk? These are the … Continue reading

Changes

Change is inevitable. I know that, still it’s always a shock to me when something that has been for years and years ceases to be. Lately, it seems like a lot of things are changing. There are the stores that have disappeared: Toys R Us, Radio Shack, Borders, for example. … Continue reading

Too Old to Write? Too Young?

Is there an age when people are deemed “old enough” to be a writer? Or “too old” to think about writing and selling a book? Many schools have programs where children are encouraged to write stories, then the adults put them into a book form. That’s a great program, but … Continue reading

Independent Bookstores

While at Sleuthfest last February, I sat in on a session given by Joanna Sinchuk, manager of the Murder on the Beach Mystery Bookstore in Pineapple Grove Delray Beach, Florida. I thought about her talk recently when CBS ran a feature on April 23rd about Independent Bookstores. When the big … Continue reading