My Guest, Elizabeth Meyette, Talks About a Ghost

Elizabeth Meyette and I decided to trade blogs this week. She’s posting on mine, and I’m on hers Elizabeth Meyette. We’re both talking about books we’ve written (and have available) that are perfect reading for the Halloween season.

Here’s Elizabeth’s explanation on how she came to write The Cavanaugh House, along with a blurb and excerpt from the book. Take it away, Elizabeth.

Thanks. Well, I love a ghost story.

As Rich and I were driving along a busy Canadian highway, the first sentence of The Cavanaugh House wormed its way into my brain: This house held secrets… Along with the sentence came an image of an old deserted house that would almost act as a character in the story. As we traveled along, I saw the exact house I had envisioned, deserted and slumping by the side of the road. We stopped and photographed it, and one of the photos became my book cover. The next day, we were at Belhurst Castle for a wine tasting when our server suggested using the castle for a setting for my book since it was haunted.

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Haunted??

She told us the legend, I bought the book about the castle’s history (only writers go to a wine tasting and leave with a book), and toured the first floor of Belhurst Castle asking the staff about ghostly encounters. The castle became the inspiration for Wyndham Estate and St. Bartholomew’s Academy for Girls in the book. But the ghost, she became part of Jesse’s story in The Cavanaugh House.

The Cavanaugh House blurb

When Jesse Graham unlocks the door to the deserted house she inherited from her Aunt Helen, she doesn’t realize she’s unlocking secrets that had lain dormant for years. Someone doesn’t want those secrets unearthed and will stop at nothing, even murder, to keep them hidden. Questions about her aunt’s death lead Jesse to investigate events surrounding it and the people involved, but she uncovers a web of deceit that reaches far beyond the occurrences of twenty-eight years ago. Still reeling from a broken engagement, Jesse finds it difficult to trust anyone, even her self-absorbed mother. Her dearest friend Maggie, aka Sr. Angelina, is her lifeline to sanity. Joe Riley is irresistible, but secrets obstruct involvement with him until Jesse can solve the mystery of the Cavanaugh House.

The Cavanaugh House excerpt

Jesse slept deeply until just after midnight when she was awakened by the same noise she’d heard the previous night.

Scritch, Scritch, Scritch.

There was no wind. In fact the night was still and no breeze came through the open windows. She tried to ignore the fear that pricked at her. Surely there was a logical explanation for the sound; she needed to figure this out once and for all. She turned on the lamp by a red bean bag chair and started for the stairs. Again, the noise came from above her; that would be the large attic room. She climbed the stairs and moved toward the door registering every creak the floorboards made.  Funny how you don’t notice noises like that during the day, she thought.

Her hands felt sweaty as she grasped the doorknob, and they slid around the glass ineffectively. She wiped her palm on her t-shirt, grasped the knob tighter and turned it; the catch released. She inched the door open, switched on the light and stepped into the room.

Nothing. Nothing moved, nothing made noise, nothing seemed out of place. Jesse scanned the room, then knelt down to look under the armoire, holding her breath lest any critters survived Erik’s full-fledged attack. All clear. Glancing at the window, she observed that the tree branch didn’t touch the pane at all. When she turned to leave, she noticed that the door to the armoire was ajar; she was sure she had closed it after inspecting the clothes hanging inside. She approached it and yanked both doors wide causing the fringe on her aunt’s cowgirl jacket to swing making a swishing sound.

“You certainly had curious taste, Aunt Helen,” she said aloud.

She heard a sigh. Her scalp prickled and she broke out in a clammy sweat. Closing the doors of the armoire, Jesse hugged herself against the chill. As suddenly as she felt it, it was gone. She trembled as she looked around for the source of the draft. Finding nothing, she turned off the light and hurried out of the room, closing the door behind her.

Returning to her sleeping bag on the living room floor, she lay down and pondered what had just happened. Not only did she inherit a dilapidated, abandoned, old-fashioned house, apparently it was haunted as well. Haunted by her dead aunt who hanged herself. Probably in that upstairs attic room.

Great.

Elizabeth Meyette

Elizabeth Meyette

Elizabeth Meyette’s bio:

Author, poet, and blogger, Elizabeth Meyette has journeyed through a career in education to a career in writing. Elizabeth put her writing on hold while she taught English, Journalism and Library Science/Technology. She is the author of two historical romances set in Colonial America, Love’s Destiny and Love’s Spirit. Her third novel, The Cavanaugh House, is a mystery set in the Finger Lakes region of New York State.

Elizabeth and her husband Richard live in the Great Lakes Bay area of Michigan. They made an agreement that she cannot cook on writing days after he had endured burnt broccoli and overcooked chicken.  Fortunately, Richard is an excellent cook.

Visit Elizabeth at www.elizabethmeyette.com. Her blog, Meyette’s Musings can be found at http://elizabethmeyette.blogspot.com.

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Buy Elizabeth’s books at:

Amazon (The Cavanaugh House is only available on Kindle at present)
Barnes & Noble
iTunes
Kobo

 

 

 

 

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10 Responses to My Guest, Elizabeth Meyette, Talks About a Ghost

  1. What a pleasure to share my thoughts on your blog today, Maris. Thank you so much for inviting me!

  2. I have goosebumps! Wonderfully suspenseful scene. I also liked the story of your idea origins. Great picture on the cover! 🙂

  3. Becky Lower says:

    I loved your line, Betty, about going to a wine tasting and leaving with a book! How true. I loved Belhurst Castle, and seeing your abandoned house by the side of the road. Really brought it home, so to speak.

    • Becky, I am so glad you got to see both Belhurst Castle and the house! I am working on the sequel, and Belhurst Castle is the inspiration for St. Bartholomew’s Academy for girls.

  4. Melissa Keir says:

    I love houses with a history. Growing up we lived in an 80 year old house with the original wallpaper, curtains and woodwork. They added a bathroom downstairs but never insulated it so the toilet froze in the winter.

    All the best!

  5. Julia Masters says:

    I love hearing how writers find inspiration and ideas for their stories. I smiled when I read about you attending the wine tasting and leaving with a book!